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4:20

Apr 24 '14
rtamerica:

US spy-satellite agency failed to report sex crimes against children to authorities
The agency that controls US intelligence satellites failed to inform law enforcement when some employees and contractors admitted during lie detector tests to child abuse crimes, according to the intelligence inspector general.
The US National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), which operates surveillance satellites for the US intelligence community, was also found in other cases to have delayed reporting to authorities admissions of criminal activity uncovered during security clearance polygraph tests. Two inspector general reports released Tuesday found these delays possibly imperiled evidence in investigations or even endangered children.
In one case, an NRO legal counsel advised employees against reporting admissions by a government contractor of child molestation, viewing child pornography, and sexting with a minor, according to theOffice of the Intelligence Community Inspector General.

rtamerica:

US spy-satellite agency failed to report sex crimes against children to authorities

The agency that controls US intelligence satellites failed to inform law enforcement when some employees and contractors admitted during lie detector tests to child abuse crimes, according to the intelligence inspector general.

The US National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), which operates surveillance satellites for the US intelligence community, was also found in other cases to have delayed reporting to authorities admissions of criminal activity uncovered during security clearance polygraph tests. Two inspector general reports released Tuesday found these delays possibly imperiled evidence in investigations or even endangered children.

In one case, an NRO legal counsel advised employees against reporting admissions by a government contractor of child molestation, viewing child pornography, and sexting with a minor, according to theOffice of the Intelligence Community Inspector General.

Apr 24 '14
rtamerica:

Vermont poised to enact toughest US GMO-labeling law yet
Vermont lawmakers have passed legislation that requires food made with genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, to be labeled as such. The law, the first of its kind in the US, must now get approval from Gov. Peter Shumlin, who has supported the bill.
The state House of Representatives approved the bill on Wednesday by a vote of 114-30. The state Senate passed the legislation last week by a vote of 28-2.
The bill would require any foods containing GMOs sold at retail outlets to be labeled as having been produced or partially produced with “genetic engineering.” The law would go into effect on July 1, 2016.

rtamerica:

Vermont poised to enact toughest US GMO-labeling law yet

Vermont lawmakers have passed legislation that requires food made with genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, to be labeled as such. The law, the first of its kind in the US, must now get approval from Gov. Peter Shumlin, who has supported the bill.

The state House of Representatives approved the bill on Wednesday by a vote of 114-30. The state Senate passed the legislation last week by a vote of 28-2.

The bill would require any foods containing GMOs sold at retail outlets to be labeled as having been produced or partially produced with “genetic engineering.” The law would go into effect on July 1, 2016.

Apr 24 '14
priceofliberty:

rtamerica:

LA cops accused of cutting power to marijuana clinic, planting guns
Two former Los Angeles County deputies were charged Wednesday in connection with allegations they switched off electricity at a medical marijuana dispensary, disabling a surveillance camera and possibly planting firearms there.
Julio Cesar Martinez, 39, and Anthony Manuel Paez, 32, were initially charged with conspiracy, perjury, and altering evidence although court documents obtained by the Los Angeles Times show that each was charged with two felony counts Wednesday, conspiring to obstruct justice and altering evidence. Martinez also faces additional felony counts of perjury and filing a false report, the paper noted.
Prosecutors said each ex-officer faces more than seven years in state prison if convicted in connection with the August 2011 incident.

#myLAPD

priceofliberty:

rtamerica:

LA cops accused of cutting power to marijuana clinic, planting guns

Two former Los Angeles County deputies were charged Wednesday in connection with allegations they switched off electricity at a medical marijuana dispensary, disabling a surveillance camera and possibly planting firearms there.

Julio Cesar Martinez, 39, and Anthony Manuel Paez, 32, were initially charged with conspiracy, perjury, and altering evidence although court documents obtained by the Los Angeles Times show that each was charged with two felony counts Wednesday, conspiring to obstruct justice and altering evidence. Martinez also faces additional felony counts of perjury and filing a false report, the paper noted.

Prosecutors said each ex-officer faces more than seven years in state prison if convicted in connection with the August 2011 incident.

#myLAPD

Apr 24 '14
latinagabi:

setfabulazerstomaximumcaptain:

did-you-kno:

Source

WHAT?!

yep. This was actually a ‘program’ started by the Fascist/Catholic regime in Spain during Franco’s dictatorship. The idea was to steal babies from ‘left leaning’ parents, poor single mothers and sell them to right wing parents. The Spanish Catholic church has been quiet about this, but there have been dozens of protests and lawsuits. Investigations are still going on. There’s a really interesting documentary on this, I’ll have to find it.
This is another reason why I have zero respect for the Catholic Church in Spain, or Franco sympathizers.

latinagabi:

setfabulazerstomaximumcaptain:

did-you-kno:

Source

WHAT?!

yep. This was actually a ‘program’ started by the Fascist/Catholic regime in Spain during Franco’s dictatorship. The idea was to steal babies from ‘left leaning’ parents, poor single mothers and sell them to right wing parents. The Spanish Catholic church has been quiet about this, but there have been dozens of protests and lawsuits. Investigations are still going on. There’s a really interesting documentary on this, I’ll have to find it.

This is another reason why I have zero respect for the Catholic Church in Spain, or Franco sympathizers.

Apr 24 '14
"Follow your inner moonlight; don’t hide the madness."
Allen Ginsberg (via petrichour)

(Source: observando)

Apr 24 '14
freshdotdaily:

terrifyingly accurate summations.

freshdotdaily:

terrifyingly accurate summations.

(Source: pierogi2000.com)

Apr 23 '14
"Where there is anger, apply loving kindness. Where there is evil, offer good. Where there is stinginess, be generous. Where there are lies, be truthful."
Thích Nhất Hạnh (via purplebuddhaproject)
Apr 23 '14

(Source: thanoblesavage)

Apr 23 '14
priceofliberty:

lillabet:

menagerieofchaos:

thefreelioness:

thelandofmaps:

U.S. Imprisonment Rate Per 100,000 Residents, 1978-2012

The US incarcerates more people per capita than any other nation in the world: Approximately 1 in 100 adults or more than 2.2 million people are behind bars in the US, according to the Pew Center on the States. In addition, another 4.6 million (or a total of almost 7 million) people live under some form of correctional supervision. 
Mass incarceration is not a result of higher crime rates: The US has the highest incarceration rate in the world not because it has higher crime rates, but because it imprisons more types of criminal offenders, including non-violent and drug offenders, and keeps them in prison longer. With the exception of homicide, US crime rates are comparable to other European countries with much lower incarceration rates. 
Mass incarceration disproportionately impacts US racial minorities: Mass incarceration has had a devastating effect on blacks and Hispanics in the US. African Americans are six times more likely to be incarcerated than a white person and non-white Latinos are almost three times more likely to be incarcerated, according to the Pew Center on the States. 
Incarceration hits hardest at young black and Latino men without high school education. An astounding 11 percent of black men, aged between 20 and 34, are behind bars. Much of the racial disparity is a result of the US’ war on drugs - started by President Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. By 1988, blacks were arrested on drug charges at five times the rate of whites. By 1996, the rate of drug admissions to state prison for black men was 13 times greater than the rate for white men. This is despite the fact that African Americans use drugs at roughly the same rate as white Americans. 
Mass incarceration is expensive: Imprisoning people is not cheap. The average cost of housing an inmate is approximately $20,000 to $30,000 per year. This price tag comes at the direct expense of public money that could be spent on public education, medical care and public assistance. And it is one reason why so many states face fiscal crises today. 
Source

Okay, not to dispute that this is wrong and the such, but since this is based on a number and not a percent, then doesn’t it make sense that as the population in the USA grows, so does the number of criminals thus the number in the jails?

Population increase doesn’t take into account the fact that the US represents 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. It’s the highest known incarceration rate in the world, surpassing China, North Korea, and Russia.
~750 prisoners per 100,000 people is a massive number.

menagerieofchaos — The chart states that these are numbers represented Per 100,000 Residents; that’s important. It doesn’t matter how big the population gets because this factor is expressed as a ratio which can be represented as a percentage. Whether your population goes up or down won’t change that fact that for every 100,000 residents in your state N are imprisoned. So when N increases, regardless of overall population change, it means that a larger percentage of your population is imprisoned.

priceofliberty:

lillabet:

menagerieofchaos:

thefreelioness:

thelandofmaps:

U.S. Imprisonment Rate Per 100,000 Residents, 1978-2012

The US incarcerates more people per capita than any other nation in the world: Approximately 1 in 100 adults or more than 2.2 million people are behind bars in the US, according to the Pew Center on the States. In addition, another 4.6 million (or a total of almost 7 million) people live under some form of correctional supervision. 

Mass incarceration is not a result of higher crime rates: The US has the highest incarceration rate in the world not because it has higher crime rates, but because it imprisons more types of criminal offenders, including non-violent and drug offenders, and keeps them in prison longer. With the exception of homicide, US crime rates are comparable to other European countries with much lower incarceration rates. 

Mass incarceration disproportionately impacts US racial minorities: Mass incarceration has had a devastating effect on blacks and Hispanics in the US. African Americans are six times more likely to be incarcerated than a white person and non-white Latinos are almost three times more likely to be incarcerated, according to the Pew Center on the States. 

Incarceration hits hardest at young black and Latino men without high school education. An astounding 11 percent of black men, aged between 20 and 34, are behind bars. Much of the racial disparity is a result of the US’ war on drugs - started by President Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. By 1988, blacks were arrested on drug charges at five times the rate of whites. By 1996, the rate of drug admissions to state prison for black men was 13 times greater than the rate for white men. This is despite the fact that African Americans use drugs at roughly the same rate as white Americans. 

Mass incarceration is expensive: Imprisoning people is not cheap. The average cost of housing an inmate is approximately $20,000 to $30,000 per year. This price tag comes at the direct expense of public money that could be spent on public education, medical care and public assistance. And it is one reason why so many states face fiscal crises today. 

Source

Okay, not to dispute that this is wrong and the such, but since this is based on a number and not a percent, then doesn’t it make sense that as the population in the USA grows, so does the number of criminals thus the number in the jails?

Population increase doesn’t take into account the fact that the US represents 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. It’s the highest known incarceration rate in the world, surpassing China, North Korea, and Russia.

~750 prisoners per 100,000 people is a massive number.

menagerieofchaos — The chart states that these are numbers represented Per 100,000 Residents; that’s important. It doesn’t matter how big the population gets because this factor is expressed as a ratio which can be represented as a percentage. Whether your population goes up or down won’t change that fact that for every 100,000 residents in your state N are imprisoned. So when N increases, regardless of overall population change, it means that a larger percentage of your population is imprisoned.

Apr 23 '14
at Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts

at Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts

Apr 23 '14
"I don’t understand why when we destroy something created by man we call it vandalism, but when we destroy something by nature we call it progress."
Ed Begley Junior (via budddha)

(Source: mknmv)

Apr 23 '14
"Trust yourself. At the root, at the core, there is pure sanity, pure openness. Don’t trust what you have been taught, what you think, what you believe, what you hope. Deeper than that, trust the silence of your being."
Gangaji (via budddha)

(Source: faith-in-humanity)

Apr 23 '14
"Know yourself as Nothing. Feel yourself as Everything."
Alan Watts (via budddha)

(Source: purplebuddhaproject)

Apr 22 '14
Nirvana - The Man Who Sold The World (Unplugged in New York)

currentrotation:

"The Man Who Sold the World" by David Bowie, remake by Nirvana

"We must have died alone, a long long time ago…"

Apr 22 '14
"The present moment is the
substance with which the future is
made. Therefore, the best way to
take care of the future is to take
care of the present moment. What
else can you do?"
Thích Nhất Hạnh (via budddha)

(Source: spirit-song)